Sunday, June 10, 2007

Patchan holes in Valley Campaign historiography

University of Nebraska Press's publication of Shenandoah Summer: The 1864 Valley Campaign, should serve to further cement Scott Patchan's reputation as a bright light among 1864 Valley Campaign scholars. Along with the previous work of Haselberger, Alexander, and Meaney (among others), Patchan's book helps bridge existing gaps in the literature between Early's Raid on Washington and Phil Sheridan's destructive final campaign in the valley. Patchan is also the author of a very impressive battle study [see brief review] drawn from Hunter's Raid, The Forgotten Fury: The Battle of Piedmont, Virginia (Sergeant Kirkland's Press, 1996), which is sadly out of print.

I should have a review up of Shenandoah Summer within a few weeks, and Scott has also consented to be subjected to an author Q&A (haven't had one of those in a while). You might also wish to check out the current issue of Blue and Gray Magazine. The feature article on the Battle of Cedar Creek is authored by Patchan.

I think it also deserves mention that, while specialization in military history isn't exactly popular among university programs, the subject is far from ignored or marginalized by most of the better academic presses. It should be pretty clear to readers by this point that I have an affinity for military studies, and yet probably two-thirds of more of the books I read and/or review on this site are published by university presses.

4 comments:

  1. David CorbettJune 11, 2007

    Der Drew ,
    The interview is always appreciated . Thank you .
    all for the old flag ,
    David Corbett

    ReplyDelete
  2. Re: "I think it also deserves mention that, while specialization in military history isn't exactly popular among university programs, the subject is far from ignored or marginalized by most of the better academic presses."

    Good point!

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  3. I think if you had to choose a segment of Civil War publishing as essential, it would have to be university presses. There is a good mix of professional and avocational historian authors and the range of subjects, level of research, and beauty of presentation is unmatched. With the gaps filled in by small and medium sized private publishers, readers are in pretty good shape...at least right now.

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  4. Now the prices of some academic press books...that's a different matter. I've seen a number of new and upcoming CW releases from a few different presses priced in the $60-$80 range.

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